What is the connection between Whitby and Dracula?

Having just finished reading Dracula, New Zealander Daz was inspired to explore Whitby – which has strong connections with the world’s most famous bloodsucker. He walks the 199 steps to Dracula’s Whitby Abbey and graveyard, visits the Captain Cook museum and also feeds another of his passions – food –  trying a local fish dish.

Courtesy of The Telegraph.

A vampire-like beast is called NC’s ‘creepiest urban legend’

The creepiest urban legends from every state have been compiled by The Business Insider’s travel section, This is Insider Travel, and North Carolina made the list for something called the “Beast from Bladenboro.” Reports date back to the early 1950s, according to Insider Travel, when multiple dogs were found drained of blood in the town of Bladenboro, which is about three hours southeast of Charlotte.

Courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.

War tore apart the city that hosted the 1984 Winter Olympics — here’s what the abandoned venues look like today

On February 8, the 2018 Winter Olympics will kick off in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The country has devoted over $1 billion toward building gleaming new stadiums and slopes. For Olympic host cities, this kind of major investment is not unusual. But after the world’s TV sets tune out, some of these cities do not have the infrastructure for upkeep of the venues. In the case of Sarajevo, Bosnia, some Olympic sites were torn apart by war.

Courtesy of Business Insider.

Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss will start writing their Dracula series “next month” – and they have some great ideas

While it sounds like Sherlock fans are going to wait a long time to see any more episodes, fans of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss’ writing do have something to look forward to in the pair’s upcoming take on Dracula, which was announced last year and remains mysterious.

Courtesy of Radio Times.

A Valentine to 1931’s ‘Dracula’: Universal Touted Film as a Love Story

Two months before the movie “Dracula” opened in 1931, Universal took out a Variety ad promoting it as “The story of the strangest passion the world has ever known!” That spin reflected the fear of some executives that women couldn’t resist a love story but might be put off by blood-sucking vampires — even though the novel and stage adaptation had been big hits.

Courtesy of Variety.

I Copied the Routines of Famous Writers and It Sucked

Writers are obsessed with routines. With the exception of religion and perhaps grooming, no pursuit is as closely joined to the idea of the Holy Routine as much as writing is. It’s why writers’ routines have become an entire genre of web content. Frustrated scribes can easily find hundreds of lists online detailing the various schedules of their successful and productive counterparts, all laid out neatly like an instruction manual. The subtext of these compilations is always the same: You need a routine, so why not try one of these?

Courtesy of Vice.

Bram Stoker’s Horror Classic is Steeped in the Anxieties of his Age

Bram Stoker’s interest in the macabre seems to have been with him from his youth. While at Trinity College, Dublin, he became a member of the University’s Philosophical Society, and the first paper he presented was “Sensationalism in Fiction and Society.” After graduation, he worked as a theater critic for the Dublin Evening Mail. The paper was owned by Sheridan Le Fanu, who ended up being a far larger influence on Stoker’s creative life a few years later. It was Le Fanu’s story Carmilla, about a female vampire preying on a lonely woman, which seems to lay the groundwork for the vampire fiction after it, most directly Stoker’s famous novel.

Courtesy of Tor.com.