What Buffy the Vampire Slayer can teach us about mental illness

“The hardest thing in this world is to live in it.”

I’ve been thinking of those words a lot lately. With the recent losses of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade, a general sense of darkness in the world as we’ve come to know it, and my own ongoing struggles with depression and anxiety, struggles that ebb and flow from still and calm to crashing, crushing waves, those famous words uttered by Buffy Summers in the Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 5 episode “The Gift” are etched in that part of my gut where I most feel my own mental illness.

Courtesy of Syfy Wire.

The Best, Worst, and Weirdest Adaptations of Dracula

May 26, 1897, saw the publication of Dracula, a gothic horror novel written by Irish author Bram Stoker. The book was not a commercial hit upon release, although critics of the time compared it with mighty praise to writers like Mary Shelley and Emily Brontë. Arthur Conan Doyle was a fan too. Over the next few decades, cinema was born, and directors latched onto Dracula as a means to explore the origins of horror film.

Courtesy of Syfy Wire.

Serbian village hopes its vampire will rival Dracula as tourist draw

A Serbian village, inspired by Dracula tourism in neighboring Romania, is hoping to capitalize on its own vampire legend.

As yet, an unmarked grave that could be that of Petar Blagojevic, a peasant who died in 1725, is not quite the spectacle of Bran Castle, which has become known as the home of Dracula and attracts visitors from around the world.

But that is not stopping the villagers of Kisiljevo, around 100 km (60 miles) east of Belgrade, from dreaming big.

Courtesy of Reuters.

Netflix Orders Vampire Drama ‘V-Wars’ to Series, Ian Somerhalder to Star

Netflix has given a straight-to-series order to a series adaptation of the “V-Wars” book series written by Jonathan Maberry.

The streaming giant has given the drama series a 10-episode first season order. Ian Somerhalder will star as Dr. Luther Swann, who enters a world of horror when a mysterious disease transforms his best friend, Michael Fayne, into a murderous predator who feeds on other humans.

Courtesy of Variety

Hollywood’s First Black Vampire Flick Tackled the Slave Trade, Racism and Black Love in 1972

It was one of the first genre movies directed by a black director and starring a mostly-black cast that became one of the highest grossing films of 1972, the same year that brought us The Godfather and Cabaret. I’m of course talking about William Crain’s Blacula.

This is relevant to both Daughters of Shadow and Blood and Dreadful Penny.

Courtesy of The Mary Sue.

What is the connection between Whitby and Dracula?

Having just finished reading Dracula, New Zealander Daz was inspired to explore Whitby – which has strong connections with the world’s most famous bloodsucker. He walks the 199 steps to Dracula’s Whitby Abbey and graveyard, visits the Captain Cook museum and also feeds another of his passions – food –  trying a local fish dish.

Courtesy of The Telegraph.

A vampire-like beast is called NC’s ‘creepiest urban legend’

The creepiest urban legends from every state have been compiled by The Business Insider’s travel section, This is Insider Travel, and North Carolina made the list for something called the “Beast from Bladenboro.” Reports date back to the early 1950s, according to Insider Travel, when multiple dogs were found drained of blood in the town of Bladenboro, which is about three hours southeast of Charlotte.

Courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.

Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss will start writing their Dracula series “next month” – and they have some great ideas

While it sounds like Sherlock fans are going to wait a long time to see any more episodes, fans of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss’ writing do have something to look forward to in the pair’s upcoming take on Dracula, which was announced last year and remains mysterious.

Courtesy of Radio Times.

A Valentine to 1931’s ‘Dracula’: Universal Touted Film as a Love Story

Two months before the movie “Dracula” opened in 1931, Universal took out a Variety ad promoting it as “The story of the strangest passion the world has ever known!” That spin reflected the fear of some executives that women couldn’t resist a love story but might be put off by blood-sucking vampires — even though the novel and stage adaptation had been big hits.

Courtesy of Variety.