Neil Gaiman Reads Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”

The Worldbuilders charity passed a very big stretch goal for 2016 (one million dollars!), so today Neil Gaiman read a poem chosen for him by the charity: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven.” Surrounded by candles, a flickering fire, and wearing the coat of a murdered prince of Stormhold, Gaiman is here to make the changing seasons more atmospheric for fans everywhere.

Courtesy of Tor.com.

The Raven

Another design from BLAZONED:

The Raven
The Raven

In Western culture, ravens, because of their black feathers, rasping call, and tendency to eat carrion, have always been harbingers of doom. Yet, ravens are extremely smart. They can be taught to speak. They learn through trial-and-error. They have been observed to play and even mourn for their dead. These behaviors have also made ravens a symbol of wisdom, as evidenced by the Norse god Odin’s two ravens who fly around the world every day and tell him of everything.

Edgar Allan Poe used the raven’s reputation to his advantage in The Raven, his poem about lost love and longing.