The Best, Worst, and Weirdest Adaptations of Dracula

May 26, 1897, saw the publication of Dracula, a gothic horror novel written by Irish author Bram Stoker. The book was not a commercial hit upon release, although critics of the time compared it with mighty praise to writers like Mary Shelley and Emily Brontë. Arthur Conan Doyle was a fan too. Over the next few decades, cinema was born, and directors latched onto Dracula as a means to explore the origins of horror film.

Courtesy of Syfy Wire.

Hollywood’s First Black Vampire Flick Tackled the Slave Trade, Racism and Black Love in 1972

It was one of the first genre movies directed by a black director and starring a mostly-black cast that became one of the highest grossing films of 1972, the same year that brought us The Godfather and Cabaret. I’m of course talking about William Crain’s Blacula.

This is relevant to both Daughters of Shadow and Blood and Dreadful Penny.

Courtesy of The Mary Sue.

What is the connection between Whitby and Dracula?

Having just finished reading Dracula, New Zealander Daz was inspired to explore Whitby – which has strong connections with the world’s most famous bloodsucker. He walks the 199 steps to Dracula’s Whitby Abbey and graveyard, visits the Captain Cook museum and also feeds another of his passions – food –  trying a local fish dish.

Courtesy of The Telegraph.

Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss will start writing their Dracula series “next month” – and they have some great ideas

While it sounds like Sherlock fans are going to wait a long time to see any more episodes, fans of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss’ writing do have something to look forward to in the pair’s upcoming take on Dracula, which was announced last year and remains mysterious.

Courtesy of Radio Times.

A Valentine to 1931’s ‘Dracula’: Universal Touted Film as a Love Story

Two months before the movie “Dracula” opened in 1931, Universal took out a Variety ad promoting it as “The story of the strangest passion the world has ever known!” That spin reflected the fear of some executives that women couldn’t resist a love story but might be put off by blood-sucking vampires — even though the novel and stage adaptation had been big hits.

Courtesy of Variety.

Bram Stoker’s Horror Classic is Steeped in the Anxieties of his Age

Bram Stoker’s interest in the macabre seems to have been with him from his youth. While at Trinity College, Dublin, he became a member of the University’s Philosophical Society, and the first paper he presented was “Sensationalism in Fiction and Society.” After graduation, he worked as a theater critic for the Dublin Evening Mail. The paper was owned by Sheridan Le Fanu, who ended up being a far larger influence on Stoker’s creative life a few years later. It was Le Fanu’s story Carmilla, about a female vampire preying on a lonely woman, which seems to lay the groundwork for the vampire fiction after it, most directly Stoker’s famous novel.

Courtesy of Tor.com.

Hoia Baciu: Inside the creepiest forest in Transylvania

We are in The Clearing. The trees stop in a uniform oval where nothing grows and where, since official records began, nothing has grown. “Once when I came here,” says Alex, our guide, “I found 60 people from Bucharest trying to open a gate into another dimension.”

I set a significant scene in Daughters of Shadow and Blood here.

Courtesy of The Independent.

A Trip to Transylvania, Without the Bite

Romanian friends told us this area of medieval villages and fortified churches had little to do with the fiction of “Dracula,” yet the night was turning into a vampirish cliché. In his 1897 novel, the Irish writer Bram Stoker described the Carpathian pass as “an imaginative whirlpool” where every known superstition gathered. I saw how he might get that idea.

Courtesy of the Wall Street Journal.

This Goth-Filled Seaside Town Inspired ‘Dracula’

Every October, the English seaside town of Whitby transforms into a page taken right out of a Bram Stoker novel.

All types of subcultures—from goths clad in 19th-century corsets and bustles to steampunks sporting vintage flying goggles—descend on this quiet port for Whitby Goth Weekend, the United Kingdom’s largest goth event.

You can see Whitby Abbey in the background of Daughters of Shadow and Blood – Book III: Elizabeth.

Courtesy of National Geographic Australia.