A (Very Brief) Guide to Romanian Pronunciation

Scânteia newspaper, April 28, 1962 - Fototeca online a comunismului românesc, Photo no: #W086 Quota:3/1962
Scânteia newspaper, April 28, 1962 – Fototeca online a comunismului românesc, Photo no: #W086 Quota:3/1962

Within Daughters of Shadow and Blood – Book I: Yasamin is the story of Mihai Viteazul, a sixteenth-century Romanian prince, and of course, Dracula himself, Vlad Țepeș, was Romanian. Among the Romanian place names that occur in the novel are Cluj, Șelimbăr, Țârgoviște, Alba Iulia, and Iași.

Romanian is the easternmost Romance language, though the language has been influenced by its Slavic and Hungarian neighbors. Because the majority of Romanians belonged to the Orthodox Church, Romanian was once written with the Cyrillic alphabet, but in the nineteenth century, the transition was made to the Latin alphabet because it was considered more suited for the Romance language.

The letters are pronounced pretty much the same as in English with the exception of the following:

  • ă as in the a in about
  • â, î as in the e in open (â is used in the middle of a word and î at the beginning or end)
  • c as in the c in cat before a, o, or u and as in the ch in church before e or i
  • ch as in the c in cat before e or i
  • g as in the g in go before a, o, or u and as in the j in judge before e or i
  • gh as in the g in go before e or i
  • j as in the z in azure
  • ș as in the sh in ship
  • ț as in the ts in cats

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